album review: manic drive

Written by Emily Sierra

Suede Silver introduces himself to the music industry as a creative enthusiast, dabbling in fields such as tattooing, surfboard shaping, graphic design, photography, and videography; however, his primary focus is music. Writing, mixing and producing his own stuff, Silver has a few singles released, including “Spooky Chills” and “PCH.” Releasing his debut album Manic Drive, Silver clearly demonstrates his creative side as he takes the listener on a ride of desire, heartache, and longingliterally the record starts with keys turning into the ignition. Silver conveys his jaded emotions of falling in love through his lyrics. This concept album allows the listener to really picture themselves in a car racing to find love, and to feel the exhilaration that comes along with it.

The opening song “My Cool” projects honeyed, synthy sounds filled with echoing harmonies surrounding lyrics about how he can’t keep his cool when around or thinking about said person of interest, which the whole album revolves around. This song sets a lovesick precedence for the rest of the album. There is a dramatic break- an actual car brake- that queues the madness of “Manic Drive.”

The title track radiates cool, summer vibes through groovy, frantic guitar-driven breakdowns and shows off Silver’s vocals more than the previous song. With an interlude differing from the emphasized electric-guitar backing groove, the listener is suddenly filled with the sounds of the road. This song stays true to the title, reminding the listener that this is a chase for love.

“Dreamy” presents more prominent slow guitar rhythms all throughout the intro, chorus, and instrumental breakdowns. This song punches straight to the theme of unrequited love, pounding the listener’s heart with lyrics like “No one told me losing my mind could feel so good.” The verses are flooded with a variety of intriguing plucking patterns that highlight the emphasis of the acoustic guitar on the track. To continue the theme of being on a “manic drive,” the song ends with static breaking up satellite signal.

“Zoomable” is a cohesive blend of rough electric guitar with synth rhythms. This song is quite interesting because of the sounds that flutter behind the lyrics. This track is made to sound like the song is coming straight from the aux cord, and is the end of the wild drive to find love. Sounds of dangling keys ring in the listener’s ear, letting them know they have reached their destination, hearing doors open and close until the sounds of an acoustic guitar float around.

This describes the transition into the last song of the album, “Tag Along.” It is a very heavy-hearted, reminiscent track to close the record. This rainy-day, acoustic vibe is transcended with a yearning lyric, “Everything is better when you tag along.” It rounds out the album in such a pure way, and really displays the versatility and creativity of Silver.

If you’re looking for someone that oozes creativity, Suede Silver is definitely someone you should check out and keep tabs on. Check out his website and social media to see all of his impeccable talent and keep listening to Manic Drive.

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